On Friday 2nd Nov, 2018

Tourists warned to stop spreading ashes at popular tourist spot

Written by

Travel at 60

Tourists are given a final warning about smuggling in their loved one's ashes. Source: Getty.

Choosing the place where you want to scatter your ashes is an extremely important part of life and death.

Generally, it should be somewhere that means a lot to your life as a whole or even somewhere you felt the most joy. And for some people this place is literally the ‘happiest place on earth’.

Disneyland has asked tourists to stop spreading the ashes of their loved ones around the park as it’s unlawful and strictly prohibited, reports The Wall Street Journal.

Apparently the incident happens so often the clean-up crew has dedicated a specific code to call out for when ashes are found. A call for a “HEPA clean-up” means someone has attempted to scatter ashes in the park and a specific kind of ultrafine vacuum cleaner is required to clean the mess.

Loved ones can smuggle ashes easily past security through pill bottles, makeup compacts or Ziploc bags at the bottom of their handbags. They either choose to spread ashes as a tribute to Disney’s most dedicated fans or as a way of laying loved ones to rest in the place they were happiest. 

While the sentiment behind the gesture is sweet, Disneyland workers deal with it so often they now see it more as an inconvenience. They say ashes are spread in garden beds, on the Magic Kingdom lawns, during firework displays, on the Pirates of the Caribbean ride and in the moat underneath the flying elephants on the Dumbo ride.

However, the one ride that cops the morbid gesture most often is the 49-year-old Haunted Mansion attraction which is filled with imaginary ghosts and tomb stones.

One worker reiterated the situation by saying: “The Haunted Mansion probably has so much human ashes in it that it’s not even funny. 

With a reputation as the ‘happiest place on earth’ it’s no wonder Disneyland works so hard to hide anything negative that occurs in the park. Clean-ups are usually quickly dealt with and life carries on as usual.

One former worker at Disneyland told New York Post that a normal day of vomit clean-ups is generally around one or two, however his record for one day stands at 36. They also mentioned how un-glamorous those famous character costumes are considering they can reach temperatures of 55C inside.

Despite its heavily protected reputation, Disneyland suffers the same messy situations as any other theme park around.

So if you’re deciding on where to scatter a loved one’s ashes, avoid the ‘happiest place on earth’ as they’ll most likely end up in a vacuum cleaner instead.

Travel at 60
Have you been to Disneyland? What do you think about people getting their ashes spread there?
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