The coolest holidays for over-60s
By Travel at 60In Inspiration, LatestOn Monday 14th May, 2018

Will Harry and Meghan honeymoon in Namibia?

An oryx antelope in Namibia. Source: Getty

The most anticipated wedding of the year takes place this Saturday, when Prince Harry and Meghan Markle tie the knot in St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle.

Afterwards, the two travel lovers will jet off for their honeymoon – rumours are flying, but if reports by US magazine Travel+Leisure are to be believed, their first holiday as husband and wife will take place in Namibia.

The reasons for them (maybe) choosing this huge country in southwest Africa are many: not only is it still part of the Commonwealth, but we all know how much Harry loves Africa – he’s a frequent visitor (he even spent his gap year in Kenya), is passionate about animal conservation, is a co-founder of an African charity that honours the work his mother did, and has already taken Meghan on a romantic holiday to Botswana (which is also where he got the diamond for her engagement ring). 

On top of all that, as one of the least populated places on earth, the chances of bumping into many tourists will be pretty remote – just like all of Namibia's points of interest and luxury camps.

But mostly, it’s because this stark, untouched corner of Africa is truly spectacular, offering once-in-a-lifetime experiences that are simply available nowhere else on the planet.

Here are some of the things you should see and do on a trip to Namibia:

Skeleton Coast

Namibia's Skeleton Coast. Source: Getty
Namibia's Skeleton Coast. Source: Getty

The famous Skeleton Coast in northern Namibia is so named due to the fact that it's littered with shipwrecks. Take a helicopter or small plane ride to witness the Atlantic Ocean battering a coastline that abruptly rises to epic sand dunes.

Sossusvlei

An epic dune at Sossusvlei. Source: Getty
An epic dune at Sossusvlei. Source: Getty

Sossusvlei (vlei means marsh; Sossusvlei means ’dead-end marsh’) is a large, white, salt and clay pan in the southern part of the Namib Desert, surrounded by huge red dunes that are some of the highest in the world (and a photographer’s dream). Attractions include Dune 45 and Big Daddy dunes, Sesriem Canyon and Dead Vlei – where the skeletons of twisted Acacia trees, thought to be around 1,000 years old, are one of Namibia’s most iconic sights.

Stargaze in the desert

Star gazing in Dead Vlei. Source: Getty
Star gazing in Dead Vlei. Source: Getty

There's epic stargazing to be had here, in one of the least light-polluted areas in the world. The lack of moisture in the desert air also makes for a crystal-clear night sky in which the stars are very visible (especially if you go during a new moon).

Fish River Canyon

Fish River Canyon – the second-largest canyon in the world. Source: Getty
Fish River Canyon – the second-largest canyon in the world. Source: Getty

This is the largest canyon in Africa and the second-largest in the world (around 160km long, and up to 27km wide and almost 550 metres deep). Located in the south of the country, it’s a great place for hiking or to watch the sun set at the rim.

Etosha National Park

A rhino at the Etosha National Park waterhole. Source: Getty
A black rhino at the Etosha National Park waterhole. Source: Getty

Located in the northern part of Namibia, this is the country's premier game park where, if you're lucky, you'll see anything from elephants and giraffes, lions and even rhinos drinking from the waterhole.

Etosha Salt Flat

The salt flat in Etosha National Park. Source: Getty
A solitary black-backed jackal on the Etosha Salt Pan. Source: Getty

Etosha National Park is also home to an enormous salt flat. It stretches for 130 kilometres and is up to 50 kilometres wide in places. Apparently, it was formed more than 100 million years ago and is visible from space!

Spitzkoppe

'The the Matterhorn of the south'. Source: Getty
'The the Matterhorn of the south'. Source: Getty

This granite rock formation – known locally as the Matterhorn of the south – is 1,784 metres tall and an incredible 120 million years old.

Kolmanskop

One of the sand-covered houses in Kolmanskop. Source: Getty
One of the sand-covered houses in Kolmanskop. Source: Getty

This ghost town in the Namib Desert was once a small but prosperous mining village. In the early 1900s it was home to hundreds of German families who came here in search of diamonds, but has been overtaken by time and sand.

Travel at 60
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